**DISCLAIMER: I created my wrap with a triple seam for security,  but know that this seam should be closely inspected REGULARLY.  Repair ANY sign of weakness. Your child’s safety while being worn is far more important than saving any amount of money.**

Hello, friends!

Does it seem a little dusty around here or is that just me? I guess that goes with having a newborn…blogging falls wayyy down on the priority list! Sleep becomes the focus of just about every hour. :)

Speaking of both the newborn AND sleep, I’ve found that I can combine both when I wear him. I have an Ergo that I LOVE, but I always hesitate to take it out of the car (because I forget to put it back in there and then I’ve found myself out and about on multiple occasions without it…no bueno…so it stays in the car now) and it also seems a little bit bulky for the house while he’s so small.

Around Thanksgiving, I started to consider purchasing a Moby Wrap. When we were at some friends’ house for Thanksgiving, she let me try hers on when I mentioned it. I was surprised to find that A) I LOVED IT way more than I thought I would, and B) it was only a blooming long piece of knit fabric! I stood there and said, “Ummm, yeah, I can make this for cheap. Can I measure yours?!” So I did. :)

Moby Wraps are one long piece of 100% cotton jersey knit fabric that is around 6 yards long (yes, YARDS) and 22 inches wide and tapers at the end (to reduce bulk when tying), then is serged around the edges. That’s IT.

So, I made THREE wraps for significantly less still than ONE name brand wrap would have cost. (I should mention that I took advantage of Fabric.com’s Black Friday sales, so all of my fabric was on sale!) There are other ways to do this, including no-sew options (just google it), but this is how I did it. I found that this method most closely matched the original product while staying the cheapest possible route.

Here’s what you need:

  • 100% cotton jersey knit fabric (this is the one I’m using in the photos below. I also ordered this one and this one, if you want some other options without searching high and low!). I’m 5’4″ and a size 2-4, so I only needed my wrap to be 5 yards long, so I ordered 2.5 yards. Increase to 3 yards if you need a longer wrap. Regardless–look for a 100% cotton jersey knit that only has a 20-25% stretch across the grain; anything else will be too stretchy and not as secure for your babe! Also, the heavier the fabric, the better (don’t order “tissue knit”)!
  • Fabric scissors
  • Coordinating thread (I used white for the purpose of the tutorial so that you could see my stitches…normally I would have used a gray thread for this fabric!)
  • Sewing machine
  • Serger/Overlocker (optional)
  • Yard stick
  • Bowl or plate that is 7″ in diameter (or cut out a 7″ paper circle to use as a template)
  • Water- or air-soluble fabric marker
  • Pins

**DISCLAIMER: I created my wrap with a triple seam for security,  but know that this seam should be closely inspected REGULARLY.  Repair ANY sign of weakness. Your child’s safety while being worn is far more important than saving any amount of money.**

Let’s get started, shall we?

How to DIY or Make a Moby Tutorial

(I want to note that the seam in the middle serves two purposes: 1) original Moby Wraps have a tag on them that marks the middle, which aids in tying it, so the seam marks the middle on these, and 2) it allows you to buy half the fabric!)

**DISCLAIMER: I created my wrap with a triple seam for security,  but know that this seam should be closely inspected REGULARLY.  Repair ANY sign of weakness. Your child’s safety while being worn is far more important than saving any amount of money.**

Sorry, no, I didn’t change out of my running pants or t-shirt…and I had no make-up on, so you don’t get to see my face. :)

As for how long this takes, it SHOULD take less than an hour. However…there’s a chunky little 8-week-old person living in my house that refused to nap yesterday and preferred to alternate between crying and feasting on his fist, so this took me a couple of days, working in 5-minute increments. :)

DIY MobyP.S. These are the tension settings I used for my Brother 1034D. It took quite a bit of trial and error to get it set right for knit fabric, so I thought I’d share in hopes of saving you some time (and so I can remember next time)!

Brother 1034D tension setting for sewing jersey knitHappy sewing and Merry Christmas from ours to yours!

Merry Christmas Baby